Courses

2017 Fall CS5770 & PSY5770 Grad Seminar (Affective Design & Computing)

We have “ABC” in Psychology: Affect, Behavior, and Cognition. The first half of the psychology history is filled with behaviorism. In the remaining half of the century, cognitivism was dominant in Psychology and “Cognitive Sciences”. Affect was originally there, but relatively not focused on until recently. In this graduate seminar course, we will examine emotions and affect in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction with the instructor's upcoming handbook. We will begin with the definitions of the terminologies (emotion, feeling, mood, affect, etc) and cover brain mechanisms, cognitive mechanisms, affective effects on cognitive processes and behaviors, induction and measurement techniques. We will also learn about core approaches from different fields in Affective Sciences, including Affective Computing, Kansei Engineering, Hedonomics, and Emotional Design. Then, we will discuss various application domains, such as learning, driving, robots, well-being, and interface & product design, physiological computing, subliminal perception, aesthetic computing, etc.


2017 Spring PSY3870 (HCD: Human-Centered Design)

In this course, we will learn about the human-artifacts interactions or human-human interactions that can be mediated by interactive artifacts. Students will experience hands-on Human-Centered Design activities that they would do in industry settings (analysis - idea generation - design - evaluation) or academic research settings. We will practice user experience research methods (e.g., task analysis, affinity diagram, rapid prototyping, cognitive walkthrough, heuristic evaluation, contextual inquiry, survey, and experiment/usability test design) and touch traditional and current theories and perspectives (e.g., cognitive and emotional mechanisms, distributed cognition, multimodal interaction, universal design, natural user interface, embodied cognition, info viz, and sonification, etc). Moreover, we will also discuss “interactive artifacts in movies”. Students will review and critique interactions or interactive products in movies and develop further ideas based on perceptual, cognitive, and social characteristics of people. There will be lecture, but we will have discussion as much as possible. Students will conduct individual projects and team projects. Students can take this course, independent of their programming skill, design capability, or psychological background. This course is in HASS list.


2016 Fall PSY6991/CS5090 (Human-Robot Interaction)

In this course, we will explore the emerging field of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), with a focus on “social robots”. To this end, we will cover various topics related to “social aspects” of humans and the status quo in robotics research. Topics include anthropomorphism, intentions, turn taking, dialogue, emotions and culture, collaboration, social learning, assistive robots for multiple populations, robots and art, and ethics. Students will also learn how to design HRI research studies, conduct empirical research (e.g., focus group, survey, experiment, etc.), analyze the data, and write a scientific paper. Each week students will read research articles on a particular topic. These papers will serve as the basis for class discussion on the topic. Therefore, class participation will be VERY important to your success in the course. We will also discuss a variety of robots featured in movies.


2016 Fall PSY5850 (Human Factors Psychology)

In this course, we will examine Human Factors, focused on Engineering Psychology, which is the science of human behavior and capability, affecting the design and operation of systems and technology. It broadly involves redesigning system, changing the way people use machines, or changing the location in which the work takes place. To this end, first we will consider various psychological principles such as perception, information processing, memory, decision making, attention, stress, emotions, workload, and human errors. Simultaneously, we will study how to apply these principles to design and operation of systems including display, control, automation, and user-centered design. This balanced viewpoint will allow us to look at the role of human beings in the context of socio-technical systems. In addition to using Wickens' textbook, we will read classical articles in Human Factors. Students will conduct a research project through the semester (e.g., project themes: Inclusive Design, Emotional Design, beyond GUI, Social Interaction, Health, Wearable Device, etc.).


2015 Fall CS5090-02 & PSY6991-01Grad Seminar (Affective Design & Computing)

We have “ABC” in Psychology: Affect, Behavior, and Cognition. The first half of the psychology history is filled with behaviorism. In the remaining half of the century, cognitivism was dominant in Psychology and “Cognitive Sciences”. Affect was originally there, but relatively not focused on until recently. In this graduate seminar course, we will examine emotions and affect in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction with the instructor's upcoming handbook. We will begin with the definitions of the terminologies (emotion, feeling, mood, affect, etc) and cover brain mechanisms, cognitive mechanisms, affective effects on cognitive processes and behaviors, induction and measurement techniques. We will also learn about core approaches from different fields in Affective Sciences, including Affective Computing, Kansei Engineering, Hedonomics, and Emotional Design. Then, we will discuss various application domains, such as learning, driving, robots, well-being, and interface & product design, physiological computing, subliminal perception, aesthetic computing, etc.


2016 Spring PSY3200 (Motivation & Emotions)

We have “ABC” in Psychology: Affect, Behavior, and Cognition. The first half of the psychology history is filled with behaviorism. In the remaining half of the century, cognitivism was dominant. Affect was originally there, but relatively not focused on until recently. With the new paradigm of “embodied cognition” in Cognitive Science, a more holistic approach to the human mind has been emphasized, which has also brought up again “emotions and affect” on the table. In this class, we will examine motivation and emotions. First, we will learn about various types of motivation taxonomy, including physiological, psychological, and social (implicit) needs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, goal, self, mindsets, and personal control. Then, we will move on to aspects of emotions, effects of emotions on cognition, emotion regulation, and specific emotions. The lecture slide will be provided for guiding students to read through the textbook, but students are also expected to actively participate in discussion as much as possible. There will be some quizzes and assignments. Students will also write a research proposal and conduct team projects.


2015 Spring PSY5860 (Human Factors II: Multimodal Design and Measure Studio)

This is an "advanced", "practical" Human Factors course. There's no prerequisite, but if students have taken Human Factors I and Sensation & Perception, it would be much helpful. Students can take this course as a "tool" or "specialization" depending on their specialization area. As you expect from the title of the course, this course consists of two parts: design & measure. Design: The course will start with a discussion about "Creativity in Psychology" and "Creative Design". Then, we will deal with designing nontraditional interfaces, including haptic, gesture, locomotion, auditory, voice, IVR, olfactory, taste, small-screen, tangible user interfaces, brain-computer interfaces, robot interfaces, and multimodal interfaces design. Measure: This part will be composed of general performance measures, driving performance measures, workload, situation awareness, physiological measures (e.g., ECG, respiration, etc.), neuroergonomics equipment (EEG, fNIRS), eye-tracking, etc. We will "experience" these designs and measures as much as possible (not just "reading about it", but also "doing it". So, this class is called "studio"). Then, students are required to select and "master" 1 design and 1 measure throughout the semester. I'll also *try* to have some invited speakers (perhaps, with skype) of H/F&HCI practitioners, designers, and researchers in the domains of electronic products, mobile devices, and automotive design.


2014 Spring PSY4160 & PSY5160 (Sensation and Perception)

Our awareness of the surrounding environment is essentially effortless. Because we generally take sensation and perception for granted, studying this topic can be fascinating and change the way one views the world. In this course, we will investigate how humans sense and perceive the world around them. First, we will consider the philosophical questions that humans have long posed about perception, and study the methods and techniques scientists use to try to answer them. We will study the sensory pathways, fundamental perceptual processing, and higher-level meaning-making. We will cover the orienting senses, skin senses, chemical senses (smell and taste), audition, vision, and the perception of time. We will consider sensation and perception from several perspectives: physiological, psychophysical, ecological, motivational, and computational. This diversity of viewpoints also allows us to look at multi-sensory perceptual processes.


2013 Fall PSY 6991 ACSHF Grad Seminar (Affective Sciences in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction)

We have “ABC” in Psychology: Affect, Behavior, and Cognition. The first half of the psychology history is filled with Behaviorism. In the remaining half of the century, the Cognitive Revolution was dominant in Psychology and “Cognitive Sciences”. Affect was originally there, but relatively not focused on until recently. In this seminar, we will examine emotions and affect in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction. We will begin with the definitions of the terminologies (emotion, feeling, mood, affect, etc) and cover neural mechanisms, cognitive mechanisms, affective effects on cognitive processes and behaviors, induction techniques, and measurement techniques. Then, we will discuss various application domains such as learning and workplace, driving and aviation, game, robots, speech and music, sports, and interface & product design. Meanwhile, we will learn about new terminologies in Affective Sciences, including Affective Computing, Kansei Engineering, Hedonomics, Pleasurable Product Design, and Emotional Design, etc.


2013 Summer PSY4080 (Human-Computer Interaction)

In this practical course, we will learn about the human-system (computers, web, appliances, mobile devices, etc) interaction in the design and development of products people use. Students will experience hands-on HCI activities that they would do in industry settings (analysis - idea generation - design - evaluation). We will practice HCI-research methods (e.g., task analysis, affinity diagram, rapid prototyping, cognitive walkthrough, heuristic evaluation, contextual inquiry, survey, and experiment/usability test design) and touch traditional and current theory and perspectives (e.g., cognitive and emotional mechanisms, distributed cognition, multimodal interaction, universal design, natural user interface, embodied cognition, info viz, and sonification, etc). Specifically at this time, we will also discuss “HCI in movies”. Students will review and critique interactions or interactive products in movies and develop further ideas based on perceptual, cognitive, and social characteristics of people. There will be lecture, but we will have discussion as much as possible. Students will conduct individual projects and team projects (e.g., project themes: Assistive Technologies, Social Interaction, Aesthetic Computing, etc.). Students can take this course, independent of their programming skill, design capability, or psychological background. This course can also be counted as a technical elective in the CS major.